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BSc-MSc Thesis and Internship Projects, Wageningen University

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Relation between cellulose orientation and cell shape
Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth. It is organized as microfibrils. Humans use cellulose as cotton, paper, fibre, food and fodder, but it is becoming important now as biofuel and in nanotechnological application ...
Supervisor: Prof. dr. Anne Mie Emons, Dr. ir. Tijs Ketelaar, ir. Jelmer Lindeboom
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
The dynamics of the actin cytoskeleton in root hairs of Arabidopsis lines that have mutations in actin organising proteins
Root hairs are tip-growing cells; all their expansion takes place over the small surface area of the tip. This makes it easy to observe changes in growth direction and/or speed. The polarised delivery of growth materials, packag ...
Supervisor: Dr. Tijs Ketelaar
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Bubble Trouble: modeling the obstacles to water flow in cut flowers.
Water and nutrients are transported in plant stems by a system of interconnected xylem vessels. Each vessel consists of the remnants of a number of thick-walled cells that have fused into a linear string. There is lateral communic ...
Supervisor: prof. dr. Bela Mulder
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Organization of the actin cytoskeleton of Phytophthora infestans and its role in mycelium elongation
Oomycetes are a group of fungus-like eukaryotes. They are the most devastating pathogens of dicot plants, causing enormous economic damage on important crops and environmental damage in natural ecosystems. The most destructive and ...
Supervisor: Dr. Tijs Ketelaar and Dr. Francine Govers (Phytopathology)
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Root hair growth as a model system to understand plant cell growth
We are interested in the process of plant cell growth and its control. Plant cell growth is a process that takes place at the cell surface. Since tip-growing cells grow rapidly and at one side only, the principles of the growth ma ...
Supervisor: Tijs Ketelaar, Bela Mulder, and Norbert de Ruijter
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
The role of specific actin binding proteins in the organization of the cytoplasm
Proper intracellular organization is of vital importance for cellular functioning and plant development. The cytoplasm of plant cells is organized such that a pool of cytoplasm, present around the nucleus and a pool of cytoplasm i ...
Supervisor: Hannie van der Honing, Tijs Ketelaar
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Do cytoplasmic strands contain microtubules?
Proper intracellular organization is of vital importance for cellular functioning and plant development. The cytoplasm of plant cells is organized such that a pool of cytoplasm, present around the nucleus and a pool of cytoplasm i ...
Supervisor: Hannie van der Honing, Tijs Ketelaar
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Does the formation of cytoplasmic strands depend on actin?
Proper intracellular organization is of vital importance for cellular functioning and plant development. The cytoplasm of plant cells is organized such that a pool of cytoplasm, present around the nucleus and a pool of cytoplasm ...
Supervisor: Hannie van der Honing, Tijs Ketelaar
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
Characterization of the root hair cytoskeleton during Rhizobium infection thread formation
We want to learn about the cellular interplay between legume root hairs and Rhizobium bacteria. These two organisms can grow in isolation, but when they meet, they like to profit from each other in a symbiosis partnership. This in ...
Supervisor: Dr. Tijs Ketelaar and Dr. Norbert de Ruijter
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
How to make an even cell wall lamella?
Cellulose is the most abundant biopolymer on earth and organized as microfibrils. Humans use cellulose as cotton, paper, fibre, food and fodder, but it is becoming important now as biofuel and in nanotechnological applications.  ...
Supervisor: Prof. dr. Anne Mie Emons, Dr. ir. Tijs Ketelaar, Ir. Jelmer Lindeboom
Department: Plant Cell Biology, Laboratory of
 
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